August 17, 2022

More than 7 in 10 New Yorkers fear they will become a victim of violent crime, a new poll has found.

About 76% of residents are “very concerned,” or somewhat concerned, they’ll be targeted amid the Big Apple’s ongoing crime wave, according to the Spectrum News NY1/Siena College poll released Tuesday.

Only 24% said they weren’t concerned — even as crime rates continue to surge.

When asked “How concerned are you that a shooting in which a gunman targets people based on their race, religion or ethnicity will happen in your neighborhood,” 43% said they are very concerned.  

A whopping 70% of New Yorkers also said they feel less safe now than before the COVID-19 pandemic started, compared to the 3% who said they feel safer.

It comes as the latest NYPD data from last week showed gun violence had dropped by nearly a third in May compared to the same time last year — but shootings were still nearly double pre-pandemic levels.

Bloody chaos in the subway moments after a shooter opened fire on April 12.
Derek French/Shutterstock
Forty-five percent of respondents said Mayor Eric Adams is doing a poor job managing NYC's rising crime.
Forty-five percent of respondents said Mayor Eric Adams is doing a poor job managing NYC’s rising crime.
Getty Images

Other major crimes continued to increase last month, according to the NYPD data.

Of the 1,000 New Yorkers polled, 45% said Mayor Eric Adams was doing a poor job of fighting crime across the city – despite his promise to bring violence under control when he came into office in January.

His “poor” rating is even higher among Hispanics (55%) and Asians (49%), the poll showed.

A police officer at the scene of a shooting in Harlem on June 6.
A police officer at the scene of a shooting in Harlem on June 6.
J. Messerschmidt/NY Post
A surveillance image of a brutal assault taking place near the southbound train tracks in Midtown.
A surveillance image of a brutal assault taking place near the southbound train tracks in Midtown.
NYPD

Adams, as recently as Monday, has touted improvements to addressing crime since he took office, saying of the NYPD: “Their job is to take dangerous people off the street. My job and the job of my agencies is to prevent people from being dangerous. And that is the partnership we’re creating.”

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In the wake of a spate of subway crimes, including a string of shoves and April’s mass shooting on a Manhattan-bound N train, 85% they’d support having more cops in the subways and 63% were in favor of installing metal detectors.   

The latest subway shove unfolded Sunday in the Bronx when a man was caught on surveillance tossing a 52-year-old woman onto the tracks at the Jackson Avenue station.

Meanwhile, Adams’ numbers with other initiatives also aren’t glowing: Nearly 50% of those polled believe Adams is also doing a poor job addressing homelessness and 37% said he’s doing poorly when it comes to fixing Rikers.

Despite vowing to make unannounced inspections at homeless shelters in the scandal-scarred system, a Post report on Sunday showed Adams had only visited three facilities.

Commuters help one another after the subway attack on April 14.
Commuters help one another after the subway attack on April 12.
AP

Only 29% of those polled rated Adams’ overall performance as mayor as good or excellent, while 64% said he is doing fairly or poorly.

“If New Yorkers had a honeymoon with Mayor Adams, it was brief and it’s clearly over. Only 29% give him a positive rating for the job he’s doing as mayor, compared to 64% who give him a negative rating,” said Dr. Don Levy, director of the Siena College Research Institute. 

Those polled ranked Adams’ performance on par with ex-Mayor Bill de Blasio. When probed, 36% said Adams was doing as well as de Blasio, while 36% said the current mayor was doing a better overall job than his predecessor.

Surveillance footage of a suspect about to stab a woman in broad daylight. Such incidents have become more common around New York City.
Surveillance footage of a suspect about to stab a woman in broad daylight. Such incidents have become more common around New York City.

Gov. Kathy Hochul’s approval figures were only slightly higher, according to the poll.

About 35% of city residents said Hochul is doing a good job, while 46% believe the state is headed in the wrong direction.

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The NYC poll, which was conducted between May 22 and June 1, comes as voters elsewhere across the country are also fed up with rising crime – and the progressive policies being used to prosecute offenders.

In San Francisco, voters could oust District Attorney Chesa Boudin, one of the most progressive prosecutors in the country, in a rare recall election Tuesday following a string of brazen attacks and smash-and-grabs across the city.